Get Docker for Fedora

Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

To get started with Docker on Fedora, make sure you meet the prerequisites, then install Docker.

Prerequisites

OS requirements

To install Docker, you need the 64-bit version of one of these Fedora versions:

  • 24
  • 25

Remove unofficial Docker packages

Fedora’s operating system repositories contain an older version of Docker, with the package name docker instead of docker-engine. If you installed this version of Docker, remove it using the following command:

$ sudo dnf -y remove docker docker-common container-selinux

You may also have to remove the package docker-selinux which conflicts with the official docker-engine package. Remove it with the following command:

$ sudo dnf -y remove docker-selinux

The contents of /var/lib/docker are not removed, so any images, containers, or volumes you created using the older version of Docker are preserved.

Install Docker

You can install Docker in different ways, depending on your needs:

  • Most users set up Docker’s repositories and install from them, for ease of installation and upgrade tasks. This is the recommended approach.

  • Some users download the RPM package and install it manually and manage upgrades completely manually.

  • Some users cannot use third-party repositories, and must rely on the version of Docker in the Fedora repositories. This version of Docker may be out of date. Those users should consult the Fedora documentation and not follow these procedures.

Install using the repository

Before you install Docker for the first time on a new host machine, you need to set up the Docker repository. Afterward, you can install, update, or downgrade Docker from the repository.

Set up the repository

  1. Install the dnf-plugins-core package which provides the commands to manage your DNF repositories from the command line.

    $ sudo dnf -y install dnf-plugins-core
    
  2. Use the following command to set up the stable repository:

    $ sudo dnf config-manager \
        --add-repo \
        https://docs.docker.com/engine/installation/linux/repo_files/fedora/docker.repo
    
  3. Optional: Enable the testing repository. This repository is included in the docker.repo file above but is disabled by default. You can enable it alongside the stable repository. Do not use unstable repositories on on production systems or for non-testing workloads.

    Warning: If you have both stable and unstable repositories enabled, updating without specifying a version in the dnf install or dnf update command will always install the highest possible version, which will almost certainly be an unstable one.

    $ sudo dnf config-manager --set-enabled docker-testing
    

    You can disable the testing repository by running the dnf config-manager command with the --set-disabled flag. To re-enable it, use the --set-enabled flag The following command disables the testing repository.

    $ sudo dnf config-manager --set-disabled docker-testing
    

Install Docker

  1. Update the dnf package index.

    $ sudo dnf makecache fast
    

    If this is the first time you have refreshed the package index since adding the Docker repositories, you will be prompted to accept the GPG key, and the key’s fingerprint will be shown. Verify that the fingerprint matches 58118E89F3A912897C070ADBF76221572C52609D and if so, accept the key.

  2. Install the latest version of Docker, or go to the next step to install a specific version.

    $ sudo dnf -y install docker-engine
    

    Warning: If you have both stable and unstable repositories enabled, installing or updating without specifying a version in the dnf install or dnf update command will always install the highest possible version, which will almost certainly be an unstable one.

  3. On production systems, you should install a specific version of Docker instead of always using the latest. List the available versions. This example uses the sort -r command to sort the results by version number, highest to lowest, and is truncated.

    Note: This dnf list command only shows binary packages. To show source packages as well, omit the .x86_64 from the package name.

    $ dnf list docker-engine.x86_64  --showduplicates |sort -r
    
    docker-engine.x86_64  1.13.0-1.fc24                               docker-main
    docker-engine.x86_64  1.12.5-1.fc24                               docker-main   
    docker-engine.x86_64  1.12.4-1.fc24                               docker-main   
    docker-engine.x86_64  1.12.3-1.fc24                               docker-main   
    

    The contents of the list depend upon which repositories are enabled, and will be specific to your version of Fedora (indicated by the .fc24 suffix on the version, in this example). Choose a specific version to install. The second column is the version string. The third column is the repository name, which indicates which repository the package is from and by extension its stability level. To install a specific version, append the version string to the package name and separate them by a hyphen (-):

    $ sudo dnf -y install docker-engine-<VERSION_STRING>
    
  4. Start Docker.

    $ sudo systemctl start docker
    
  5. Verify that docker is installed correctly by running the hello-world image.

    $ sudo docker run hello-world
    

    This command downloads a test image and runs it in a container. When the container runs, it prints an informational message and exits.

Docker is installed and running. You need to use sudo to run Docker commands. Continue to Linux postinstall to allow non-privileged users to run Docker commands and for other optional configuration steps.

Upgrade Docker

To upgrade Docker, first run sudo dnf makecache fast, then follow the installation instructions, choosing the new version you want to install.

Install from a package

If you cannot use Docker’s repository to install Docker, you can download the .rpm file for your release and install it manually. You will need to download a new file each time you want to upgrade Docker.

  1. Go to https://yum.dockerproject.org/repo/main/fedora/ and choose the subdirectory for your Fedora version. Download the .rpm file for the Docker version you want to install.

    Note: To install a testing version, change the word main in the URL to testing. Do not use unstable versions of Docker in production or for non-testing workloads.

  2. Install Docker, changing the path below to the path where you downloaded the Docker package.

    $ sudo dnf -y install /path/to/package.rpm
    
  3. Start Docker.

    $ sudo systemctl start docker
    
  4. Verify that docker is installed correctly by running the hello-world image.

    $ sudo docker run hello-world
    

    This command downloads a test image and runs it in a container. When the container runs, it prints an informational message and exits.

Docker is installed and running. You need to use sudo to run Docker commands. Continue to Post-installation steps for Linux to allow non-privileged users to run Docker commands and for other optional configuration steps.

Upgrade Docker

To upgrade Docker, download the newer package file and repeat the installation procedure, using dnf -y upgrade instead of dnf -y install, and pointing to the new file.

Uninstall Docker

  1. Uninstall the Docker package:

    $ sudo dnf -y remove docker-engine
    
  2. Images, containers, volumes, or customized configuration files on your host are not automatically removed. To delete all images, containers, and volumes:

    $ sudo rm -rf /var/lib/docker
    

You must delete any edited configuration files manually.

Next steps

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