Redis

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Redis is an open source key-value store that functions as a data structure server.

GitHub repo: https://github.com/docker-library/redis

Library reference

This content is imported from the official Docker Library docs, and is provided by the original uploader. You can view the Docker Store page for this repo at https://store.docker.com/images/redis.

Supported tags and respective Dockerfile links

For detailed information about the published artifacts of each of the above supported tags (image metadata, transfer size, etc), please see the repos/redis directory in the docker-library/repo-info GitHub repo.

For more information about this image and its history, please see the relevant manifest file (library/redis). This image is updated via pull requests to the docker-library/official-images GitHub repo.

What is Redis?

Redis is an open-source, networked, in-memory, key-value data store with optional durability. It is written in ANSI C. The development of Redis is sponsored by Redis Labs today; before that, it was sponsored by Pivotal and VMware. According to the monthly ranking by DB-Engines.com, Redis is the most popular key-value store. The name Redis means REmote DIctionary Server.

wikipedia.org/wiki/Redis

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How to use this image

start a redis instance

$ docker run --name some-redis -d redis

This image includes EXPOSE 6379 (the redis port), so standard container linking will make it automatically available to the linked containers (as the following examples illustrate).

start with persistent storage

$ docker run --name some-redis -d redis redis-server --appendonly yes

If persistence is enabled, data is stored in the VOLUME /data, which can be used with --volumes-from some-volume-container or -v /docker/host/dir:/data (see docs.docker volumes).

For more about Redis Persistence, see http://redis.io/topics/persistence.

connect to it from an application

$ docker run --name some-app --link some-redis:redis -d application-that-uses-redis

… or via redis-cli

$ docker run -it --link some-redis:redis --rm redis redis-cli -h redis -p 6379

Additionally, If you want to use your own redis.conf …

You can create your own Dockerfile that adds a redis.conf from the context into /data/, like so.

FROM redis
COPY redis.conf /usr/local/etc/redis/redis.conf
CMD [ "redis-server", "/usr/local/etc/redis/redis.conf" ]

Alternatively, you can specify something along the same lines with docker run options.

$ docker run -v /myredis/conf/redis.conf:/usr/local/etc/redis/redis.conf --name myredis redis redis-server /usr/local/etc/redis/redis.conf

Where /myredis/conf/ is a local directory containing your redis.conf file. Using this method means that there is no need for you to have a Dockerfile for your redis container.

32bit variant

This variant is not a 32bit image (and will not run on 32bit hardware), but includes Redis compiled as a 32bit binary, especially for users who need the decreased memory requirements associated with that. See “Using 32 bit instances” in the Redis documentation for more information.

Image Variants

The redis images come in many flavors, each designed for a specific use case.

redis:<version>

This is the defacto image. If you are unsure about what your needs are, you probably want to use this one. It is designed to be used both as a throw away container (mount your source code and start the container to start your app), as well as the base to build other images off of.

redis:alpine

This image is based on the popular Alpine Linux project, available in the alpine official image. Alpine Linux is much smaller than most distribution base images (~5MB), and thus leads to much slimmer images in general.

This variant is highly recommended when final image size being as small as possible is desired. The main caveat to note is that it does use musl libc instead of glibc and friends, so certain software might run into issues depending on the depth of their libc requirements. However, most software doesn’t have an issue with this, so this variant is usually a very safe choice. See this Hacker News comment thread for more discussion of the issues that might arise and some pro/con comparisons of using Alpine-based images.

To minimize image size, it’s uncommon for additional related tools (such as git or bash) to be included in Alpine-based images. Using this image as a base, add the things you need in your own Dockerfile (see the alpine image description for examples of how to install packages if you are unfamiliar).

redis:windowsservercore

This image is based on Windows Server Core (microsoft/windowsservercore). As such, it only works in places which that image does, such as Windows 10 Professional/Enterprise (Anniversary Edition) or Windows Server 2016.

For information about how to get Docker running on Windows, please see the relevant “Quick Start” guide provided by Microsoft:

License

View license information for the software contained in this image.

Supported Docker versions

This image is officially supported on Docker version 17.04.0-ce.

Support for older versions (down to 1.6) is provided on a best-effort basis.

Please see the Docker installation documentation for details on how to upgrade your Docker daemon.

User Feedback

Issues

If you have any problems with or questions about this image, please contact us through a GitHub issue. If the issue is related to a CVE, please check for a cve-tracker issue on the official-images repository first.

You can also reach many of the official image maintainers via the #docker-library IRC channel on Freenode.

Contributing

You are invited to contribute new features, fixes, or updates, large or small; we are always thrilled to receive pull requests, and do our best to process them as fast as we can.

Before you start to code, we recommend discussing your plans through a GitHub issue, especially for more ambitious contributions. This gives other contributors a chance to point you in the right direction, give you feedback on your design, and help you find out if someone else is working on the same thing.

Documentation

Documentation for this image is stored in the redis/ directory of the docker-library/docs GitHub repo. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the repository’s README.md file before attempting a pull request.

library, sample, Redis